20/03/2014 Drawing In Singular Colours


20/03/2014 Drawing In Singular Colours

I have began experimenting with coloured pencils and oil pastels and pens for this project, by working on small pieces of paper about 30cm in width. I thought about it in my tutorial by stretching my photography so they all appear to be the same in proportion making the landscape distorted experiemtns with our vision
the mountains and forground appear to be on one plane.

They came out quite interesting some workes, others did not.

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

This is a selection of drawings of the Keepers Pond I visited and Roath Park, both were successful and beautiful as well as being in different environments so I can experiment further.

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

I found personayll blue worked more successfully than the other colours I experiwmtned with, I think it’s die tot he fact blue is my favourite colour but our brain can relate to the colour as it’s seen everyday in the natural landscape of the sky and ocean and even animals, whereas red for example is very rare we associate it with danger and mainly man made objects like stop signs or posioness berries etc.

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Because these drawings are so small they are successful in their purpose people have commented how detailed they are and it’s great that people have to really examine it as it captures their interest as its different from traditional overwhelming art that can be as big as a wall in some cases like Mark Rothko.

A4 page of drawings, Jamie Jones

A4 page of drawings, Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

I experimented with red for my next tester and I found it difficult to associate it with nature.

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

I want to experiment further with bigger rolls of wall paper rolls to see where that goes but to cut it down small but long in it’s width.

I also experimented with green pencil and pens this worked well, which I still believe we see if so commonly in the natural landscape it could be possible to see everything mostly green.

Green pen Jamie Jones

Green pen Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

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Hokusai Research Context 19/03/2014


Hokusai Research Context 19/03/2014

I began studying Hokusai’s work in relation of the use of space in his style by presenting landscapes in their basic form studying the ocean, waterfalls and mountains with singular colours in many.

Katsushika Hokusai was born (1760-1849) in Tokyo. Most well known for his print of the “Great Wave” there was originally over 5,000 prints but over the years many have been lost due to fire’s and war etc.

I have had the luxery to view one of these prints when I visited Venice, it was beautiful and smaller than I thought it would be.

Hokusai

Hokusai

He mainly used blue or more precisely Persian blue, which was imported from England to China and than Japan as it was very difficult to import or trade with other countries at the time.

By using this tone of blue made him famous it was hardly seen before and very modern for the time, which led to it’s popularity.

Hokusai

Hokusai

Hokusai

Hokusai

The way he has produced this print in regards to composition is simply beautiful by being on one plane or level by this I suggest there within the foreground is the mountain, the sea then the mountains and the sky. With very little detail he has captured the scenery beautifully it feels the landscape is all the same in proportion from the viewer it appears almost flat. I intend to recreate this from life and my photography by stretching the landscape on small pieces of paper.

Hokusai

Hokusai

Hokusai

Hokusai

What I have also noticed is how he still includes the tree in the above composition unlike his other ones this angle appears to be from the ground, where the others seem to be from a high height. It appears to be almost taller than the mountain and in relation it suggests it may even be older than the mountain due to it being almost wider and taller as trees which can take up to hundreds of years to grow to this height.

This is a important detail to take notice of for my own project in the sense of the tree, I have found previously I purposely miss out the ugly detail in the landscape to romanticise what I visionise than what I actually see this includes pylons etc

I have been learning more about his work of colour choice and subjects on this interesting website,

https://www.asia.si.edu/exhibitions/online/hokusai/launch.htm

The subject often referred to poems or stories or even myths such as the catfish at the time it was still believed a giant catfish caused the earthquakes but ti is a fact that today they can sense a earthquake as they act unusually in studies.


Group Tutorial 18/03/2014


Group Tutorial 18/03/2014

After my group tutorial with David I was left quite disheartened for this project, I have struggled all the way to feel motivated and interested. I thought it would be thrilling where I would learn a lot of new skills and I have been feeing quite disappointed with, which I mentioned in this tutorial and was quite honest about. I have been feeling that we all have to do the same as everyone else and I’m not the only one who’s been struggling to feel motivated to draw 100 drawings, this task has not helped me and it’s still not helping me develop my ideas.

During this tutorial I suggested that Tiffany should look at Brendan Burns my former tutor at Foundation as her work has many similarities which would be great for her context research. As well as Livi who has been making beautiful photography polaroid’s, I suggested what would happen if she cut them up and rearranged them in strips.

David also could not grasp what it was I wanted to study for this project. I am interested in the use of space in art, like that need of why we have to fill a whole canvas, we have been so forced to draw and study previous artists that psychologically we already know how a painting should look like, but I am curious in why? I am currently investigating Eastern art as well for my dissertation such as Hokusai and Japanese prints who only suggest with very limited colour what the landscape is about if it’s the ocean, mountains or trees. I have been experimenting with colour through Cezanne who only used a limited colour palette which David suggested I should use singular or limited colour palettes.

After this tutorial I considered why my art looked quite unrealistic and romantic which was not what I wanted to achieve, I began thinking why I liked my 360 degree drawing instead, which was more lengthily in width than the standard canvas shape. This led me to think about Livi’s work and my suggestion, from this I think I will stretch my photography and draw them on very small pieces of paper as it would be more intimate where people will have to get close and personal to see the vivid detail.


Roath Park 13/03/2014


Roath Park 13/03/2014

I visited Roath Park in Cathays as this location has some lovely memories that I cherish from feeding the swans or from various dates. I sat and drew for hours enjoying the weather, I used a range of materials such as charcoal and oil pastels as I found these easiest to use considering drawing from life, as it was quick.

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

I sat and drew this tree for ages, I think it appealed to me due to its shape and form it highly reminded me of Van Gogh studies of trees that he influenced from Japanese prints such as Hokusai it was beginning to bloom and it caught my eye.

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Roath Park

Roath Park

I spent a long time taking in my surrounding thinking of Cezanne and Van Gogh who painted from life, it’s quite difficult in reality as I’m so used to painting from within the studio I think that appreciation is lost due to the easy access to visual material online or from photograph’s.

Swans, Jamie Jones

Swans, Jamie Jones

I was surrounded my curious swans at one point which I took the opportunity to capture quickly as they cleaned their feathers. I found quite a few curious by standers past me and looked at my work I found this in town as well which I think it’s uncommon to see artists unlike photographers.

Tree in lake, Jamie Jones

Tree in lake, Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

I began thinking and studying the landscape around me instead of filling in every detail I could, I wanted to give the impression of the trees and lake rather than draw every texture and colour. It’s quite difficult, as it’s mentally challenging as I have to stop myself from constantly adding more detail or tweaking parts.

Lake, Jamie Jones

Lake, Jamie Jones

I wish I could have painted for longer but the swans began to circle me as they thought I had bread in my bag as they did not understand I had paints, which I found amusing. I can also understand why Cezanne used watercolours mainly as they are quick and take a considerable less amount of time to dry in the wilderness.

I plan to use more watercolours for my next experimental area to focus on to experiment with colour as I have expressed form and shape throughout my sketchbook.

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Lake at Roath Park

Lake at Roath Park

Lake, Jamie Jones

Lake, Jamie Jones

I found this a enjoyable experience and I would like to continue to draw from life in the open air, perhaps I will draw in town in the future but for this project I am looking at nature from a personal experience.

Roath Park, Jamie Jones

Roath Park, Jamie Jones

Sadly the weather declined quickly and I struggled to draw as I could not see the detail, which may be a good thing after some consideration as I am looking at leaving work unfinished, as it then forced me to concentrate on what was visible in the the man made landscape

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

I also attempted a 360 degree drawing starting from a willow tree as I loved the leaves, the location was not amazing for a subject but I wanted to study the trees and pick out important detail that flowed instead of the cars and every branch I could see. I closely and carefully chose the subject matter that expressed what the landscape was and how it was structured.

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones

Jamie Jones


Cardiff Museum 12/03/2014


Cardiff Museum 12/03/2014

As a class we were told to meet up at Cardiff’s National Museum and I was quite intrigued to what we were going to do. It was interesting that the museum rearranged the exhibition display moving Turner and Van Gogh from the impressionists landscape room to the classical showcase area.

John Constable

John Constable

I remember studying this piece a while back and I was taking back by it’s size it was quite large and very colourful. It is clearly a romanticised piece as it was very colourful and clearly portrayed a rainbow, Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows 1831 this originally belongs to the National Gallery in London and is now on loan to Cardiff’s exhibition. I admire how he only painted in area’s and locations that were personal to him such as around his home town etc which we both have a interest in.

Augustus Renoir

Augustus Renoir

I began looking for art that linked in with my project of spacial convention, Renoir here is a clear example of unfinished work. He has only included the detail where he though was necessary which was the facial features and only briefly highlighted the girls dress to give the impression what the texture is like.

Manet

Manet

Edouard Manet 1832-1883 is another artist I found in the museum called “Effect of snow at Petit Montrouge.” The composition in this piece is what I am exploring even-though the whole canvas is painted the space appears in complete in many ways as the define detail is left unfinished regarding the building and the boat and unlike Cezanne, he uses monotone colours that do not stand out in this but fade.

Kyffin Williams

Kyffin Williams

I found this piece caught my attention in regards of the subject rather than the style as a piece it does not stand out greatly but as a subject it’s of Mount Snowdon the shapes are quite unique and crisp to highlight the mountains hard edge. The colours all blend in together where the artists has mixed the colours on the palette than use directly from the tube which gives off this merging dirty like effect than the crisp clean many choose to use in their paintings.

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Here is a piece I have studied often, as I believe it’s due to the style and colours he portrays. The colours are quite vibrant as there is not a lot of detail but he emphases the space and subject of trees where many people will not look again at a first glance to a further second, but he does this through the colours he had chosen. The dull browns and greens appear here to be quite playful and eye catching, as we can imagine the bright blue warm day of summer and the small brisk wind upon the trees rustling the leaves.

John Piper

John Piper

It was a pleasant surprise seeing Jphn Piper’s work as I knew who it was by without reading the plaque. I have previously studied the famous landscape artist back in school exploring his methods through wax, oil pastels and ink which is a method I found quite fun and something to take into consideration in this project as I want to experiment with more mediums.

John Piper

John Piper

John Piper

John Piper


David Hockney 11/03/2014


David Hockney 11/03/2014

Another artists I have previously studied is David Hockney born in England on 9 July 1937. I think he’s important and relevant in the use of spacial convention throughout photography or more precisely photo joiners. He began this process in the 1980’s which contained Polaroid images he rearranged to tell a story through landscape or portraiture.

A clear example is within his landscape as he concentrates on what he thinks is important to show and portray, than he uses the traditional method of a singular photograph. Multiple ones explore so much detail like within this image, where he has obviously returned to this location over several days as the weather has changed from clear skies to hazy grey, this explores colour and composition which I will consider in this project with themes of composition relating to spacial conventions.

David Hockney

David Hockney

David Hockney

David Hockney

I have always admired his photography skills more than his artwork. In his paintings I find he forces too much detail in one space. This then squashes the perspective as he mentions he tries to allow the viewer to experience the landscape from various views from one location. This is something that I want to portray in a sense but leaving more to the imagination, I have found being outside in the elements have really opened my eyes and I need to draw on location more.

His work has concentrated mainly on landscape, this is a important factor for this project as I have chosen locations that are personal to me such as the Keepers Pond or Roath Park. I will continue to draw in these locations as I have so much to uncover and to study.

Another piece of work which I find very helpful is his snow piece. It almost looks like the image in itself portrays footprints, a car and the crew who are photographing Hockney in a photo shoot. This is cleaver as we deliberately set our gaze at the far left following the footprints through the snow to Hockney. The way the joiners have been placed and photographed allow us to imagine the gaps that have been left which is snow even though we unintentionally do this. I have become greatly influenced by Hockney and Cezanne for this project and in ym own practice and I will continue to do so.


Artist Context 10/03/2014


Artist Context 10/03/2014

I began looking through various artists and their unfinished works. It’s fascinating that many would not consider this art as it incomplete? Yet I do and I have always been interested in spacial conventions in art and in a painting is what I plan to study and use in my practice.

Augustus Renoir

Augustus Renoir

Renoir is a clear example of what I am visualising and studying, why does this interest me so much? I think it’s due to that early development in painting and as artist we have to express everything we can see and try and fit it on a rectangle canvas. In today’s technology we have camera’s which take seconds to capture the same subject. I plan to leave my work unfinished it will be quite challenging as through history and everything I have learnt it will be mentally challenging to pull away from that urge to finish a piece of work. It will be about highlighting the important detail and leaving the rest to the imagination through colour and texture.

Like the artist I have chosen clearly portray this. Starting with Paul Cezanne Born January 19, 1839 – October 22, 1906 who died of phenomia drawing in the awful rain which is a sad tale, but I admire him passion for his art. He is my main focus as his work clearly features many unfinshed works in the dozens.

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

These works all explore colour and how he used watercolours to simplify the important detail as he painted from life and take that back to his studio. This website explains the reason why he left many of his works unfinished in a letter to his mother http://legacy.earlham.edu/~vanbma/index/Cezanne.htm “I have to work constantly, (but) not in order to arrive at the finish, which attracts the admiration of imbeciles. I must strive to complete only for the satisfaction of becoming truer and wiser.” I understand in approach I can relate as I grow very frustrated at my own work and style I think this is what I have been looking for as I have always felt unsatisfied at a complete finished piece as in my mind I can always add to it, ruining it’s beauty and my original intent.

I plan to visit Roath park for my other location as I visited this frequently drawing in the past due to the swans and stunning landscape as I have had many happy memories here feeding the birds, it’s the one location in Cardiff I feel at total ease with and contently.

These are several other artists I have looked for inspiration.

Sir Thomas Lawrence PRA FRS (13 April 1769 – 7 January 1830 He was a English born artist from Bristol who then settled in Bath he drew detailed portrait at the age of 10 and painted a portrait of the queen at the age of eighteen.

http://www.thomas-lawrence.org/Portrait-of-George-IV-as-Prince-Regent.html His complete works, some of my favourite we apparently found in his studio unfinished apparently he took years to complete one portrait and his studio homed dozens on incomplete ones.

I would love to be able to paint portraits although I always feel frustrated at my work much like Cezanne and leaving them incomplete may be the solution I am looking for.

 Sir Thomas Lawrence

Sir Thomas Lawrence

Sir Thomas Lawrence

Sir Thomas Lawrence

Sir Thomas Lawrence

Sir Thomas Lawrence

Sir Thomas Lawrence

Sir Thomas Lawrence

Sir Thomas Lawrence

Sir Thomas Lawrence

Sir Thomas Lawrence 1828

Sir Thomas Lawrence 1828

Sir Thomas Lawrence is a major factor here as he expresses the importance in the piece of the facial features, I want to apply this in landscape as comparing this with Cezanne has the same concepts of highlight through colour the main feature of the mountains or here the eyes and face etc rather than the body. Composition is the key in this project and I need to paint and draw more from life to continue my development.

Another artist I found to have left work unfinished is Leonardo Da Vinci a great artist and inventor I admire and I have seen his work in person in London and Venice.

Leonardo Da Vinci

Leonardo Da Vinci


Adoration of the Magi 1481, oil on wood.

It is said that the person on the far right may have been Da Vinci self portrait at a younger age which may be possible studying it. It’s meaning is about of the Virgin Mary and Jesus by the foot of Basilica of Maxentius where the Romans claimed that would crumble when a virgin gave birth and apparently collapsed after Mary gave birth, even though this was not built until years later.

Another famous artist Gustov Klimt best known for “Th Kiss” his work here demonstrates a unique style and colour. Again we can see a pattern in the use of colour it’s amazing how through composition this has demonstrated the facial features accordingly.

Gustov Klimt

Gustov Klimt

This piece is also a favourite as the dress is incomplete but we care given the impression and its hinted of the detail and texture which is enough. I think this is more powerful in relation to complete works.